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Wednesday, December 5

  1. page Opium poppy edited ... These plants are hermaphroditic and are pollinated by insects. They prefer rich, moist garden …
    ...
    These plants are hermaphroditic and are pollinated by insects. They prefer rich, moist garden soil and temperate climates with a lot of sun. Poppy is often grown in succession to wheat and barley. The land is manured and plowed in the fall to ensure that it is ready come spring.
    All parts of the plant, particularly the walls of the capsules, contain vessels filled with a white latex. The capsules are usually shaped like a hemisphere but depressed at the top, with a many-rayed stigma in the middle. They also having a swollen ring below where the capsule meets the stalk ("Science Daily").
    Background
    {afghan-opium.jpg}
    The word opium originates from the Greek language, with 'opus' meaning 'a juice.' Opium cultivation has been traced back as early as 3400 B.C. in the Middle East. Homer mentions it in the Odyssey, as some kind of opium based elixir that allowed Helen of Troy to forget her sorrows (Stewart). Another text that also includes this plant is the bible. It is found in the Old Testament, with the Hebrew word "rosh" being said to refer to the poppy.
    The plant was also used for food value because of its poppy seeds. It has been been said that the Egyptians ate opium and also prepared it in the form of a flavor for a juice drink. The ancient Assyrians' medical journals refer to poppy juice and the ancient Greeks also used it for medical purposes.
    The production of opium itself has not changed significantly since ancient times. Through selective breeding, however, the content of the morphine, codeine, and thebaine has been greatly increased. Opium is often converted into heroin because it is less bulky, thus easier to smuggle. As heroin, its potency doubles in comparison to morphine. Possession of any part of the Papaver somniferum other than the seed is illegal in the United States and it is listed as a Schedule II controlled substance by the Drug Enforcement Administration (Mujassam).

    Relatives
    Other poppy:
    Oriental poppy, Papaver orientale
    Shirley poppy, P. rhoeas
    ...
    Joy plant
    Pen yan
    Background
    {afghan-opium.jpg}
    The word opium originates from the Greek language, with 'opus' meaning 'a juice.' Opium cultivation has been traced back as early as 3400 B.C. in the Middle East. Homer mentions it in the Odyssey, as some kind of opium based elixir that allowed Helen of Troy to forget her sorrows (Stewart). Another text that also includes this plant is the bible. It is found in the Old Testament, with the Hebrew word "rosh" being said to refer to the poppy.
    The plant was also used for food value because of its poppy seeds. It has been been said that the Egyptians ate opium and also prepared it in the form of a flavor for a juice drink (Kapoor.) The ancient Assyrians' medical journals refer to poppy juice and the ancient Greeks also used it for medical purposes.
    The production of opium itself has not changed significantly since ancient times. Through selective breeding, however, the content of the morphine, codeine, and thebaine has been greatly increased. Opium is often converted into heroin because it is less bulky, thus easier to smuggle. As heroin, its potency doubles in comparison to morphine. Possession of any part of the Papaver somniferum other than the seed is illegal in the United States and it is listed as a Schedule II controlled substance by the Drug Enforcement Administration (Mujassam).

    Medicine
    {4a15.jpg}
    ...
    Opium exclusion began in China in 1729 and was followed by nearly two centuries of increased opium use. Since China had a positive balance sheet with British trade, it led to a decrease of the British silver stocks. The British tried to encourage Chinese opium use to enhance their balance, and they delivered it from Indian provinces under British control. The Chinese emperor tried to stop these opium deliveries, which led to two Opium Wars in 1839 and 1858 ("European Coalition for Just and Effective Drug Policies"). As a result, Britain suppressed China and traded opium all over the country.
    After 1860, opium use continued to increase with widespread domestic production in China. More than a quarter of the male population had become regular consumers by 1905 ("Science Daily"). Recreational or addictive opium use in other nations remained rare into the late nineteenth century.
    Power of Opium in Afghanistan
    {marja_28schmidt6001.jpg}
    Power of Opium in Afghanistan
    Even after the ten years of war between the United States and Afghanistan, the country remains the world's leader in opium supple. Afghanistan is responsible for 90% of the global supply, according to sources from the United Nations (Peter). Insecurity and high prices has made it hard to halt the production of the crop, despite eradication efforts. The increased pricing has led to more Afghan farmers relying on the crop. Production is growing and is up 61% (Peter). The Afghan farmers are having difficulty finding a replacement crop that is equally as profitable. Afghan families have become dependent on this controversial plant. Opium helps the Taliban with their expenses, but it is causing tension between the government and their people.
    Video from Youtube

    ReferencesAggrawa, Anil. "Narcotic Drugs." Narcotic Drugs. (May 1995). Web. 30 Nov. 2012. <http://opioids.com/narcotic-drugs/chapter-2.html>.
    "Cannabis, Coca, & Poppy: Nature’s Addictive Plants."Cannabis, Coca, & Poppy: Nature’s Addictive Plants. Web. 30 Nov. 2012. <http://www.deamuseum.org/ccp/opium/history.html>.
    ...
    Kapoor, L. D. Opium Poppy: Botany, Chemistry, and Pharmacology. Psychology Press, 1995. Print.
    Mujassam, M. "Articles Bases." Articles Bases. (July 2011). Web. 30 Nov. 2012. <In China recreational use of the drug began in the fifteenth century but was limited by its rarity and expense. >.
    Stewart, Amy. Wicked Plants. North Carolina: Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, 2009. PrintPeter, Tom A. "CSMonitor." CSMonitor. (2011): n. page. Web. 5 Dec. 2012. <http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Asia-South-Central/2011/1011/Afghanistan-still-world-s-top-opium-supplier-despite-10-years-of-US-led-war>.
    "Science Daily." Science Daily. Web. 29 Nov. 2012. <http://www.sciencedaily.com/articles/o/opium_poppy.htm>.
    Stewart, Amy. Wicked Plants. North Carolina: Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, 2009. Print

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    9:12 am
  2. page Opium poppy edited Opium Poppy {4i2.jpg} ... But on more of the positive What is Opium? {info_opium.jpg} …

    Opium Poppy
    {4i2.jpg}
    ...
    But on more of the positive
    What is Opium?
    {info_opium.jpg}
    ...
    The exuded fluidsap is scraped,
    ...
    it dries. It is very narcotic once dried, this is the opium. This dried
    ...
    heroin (Mujassam).
    When opium is taken, it creates a feeling of euphoria but also depresses the respiratory system, which can lead to coma and death (Stewart). Because it interferes with endorphin receptors in the brain, it is difficult for addicts to use their brain's natural painkillers. THis is one of the reasons why opium is extremely addictive. One can develop physical and psychological dependence very quickly. Withdrawals from this drug can cause sweating, nausea, and the chills.

    {opium025.JPG}
    Facts
    ...
    reddish purple. These plants areOpium poppy is native to Eurasia, AfricaEurope and Northwestern America.
    These
    ...
    rich, moist garden soil and temperate climates with a lot
    All parts of the plant, particularly the walls of the capsules, contain vessels filled with a white latex. The capsules are usually shaped like a hemisphere but depressed at the top, with a many-rayed stigma in the middle. They also having a swollen ring below where the capsule meets the stalk ("Science Daily").
    Background
    {afghan-opium.jpg}
    ...
    language, with opus'opus' meaning 'a juice.' Homer mentions it in The Illiad (Kapoor). It was likely brought in from Greece through Asia Minor. Opium cultivation
    ...
    early as 26003400 B.C. in Switzerland. Thethe Middle East. Homer mentions it in the Odyssey, as some kind of opium based elixir that allowed Helen of Troy to forget her sorrows (Stewart). Another text that also includes this plant was likelyis the bible. It is found in the Old Testament, with the Hebrew word "rosh" being said to berefer to the poppy.
    The plant was also
    used for
    ...
    seeds. It is doubtedhas been been said that the narcotic propertyEgyptians ate opium and also prepared it in the form of this plant was known.a flavor for a juice drink. The fluid extracted from the plant’s ovary is very narcotic once dried, this is the opium. The first known written source mentioning opium is dated backancient Assyrians' medical journals refer to aroundpoppy juice and the third century BC.ancient Greeks also used it for medical purposes.
    The production of opium itself has not changed significantly since ancient times. Through selective breeding, however, the content of the morphine, codeine, and thebaine has been greatly increased. Opium is often converted into heroin because it is less bulky, thus easier to smuggle. As heroin, its potency doubles in comparison to morphine. Possession of any part of the Papaver somniferum other than the seed is illegal in the United States and it is listed as a Schedule II controlled substance by the Drug Enforcement Administration (Mujassam).
    Relatives
    Other poppy:
    Oriental poppy, Papaver orientale
    Shirley poppy, P. rhoeas
    Iceland Poppy, P. nudicaule

    Geographic LocationOpium is native to Asia Minor and is largely cultivated in Europe, Turkey, Persia, India and China.
    ...
    $3,000 per kilogram
    Retail:
    kilogramRetail: $16,000 per kilogram
    Addiction Opium is extremely addictive and one can develop physical and psychological dependence very quickly. Withdrawals from this drug can cause sweating, nausea, and the chills.

    Street Names
    Skee
    NamesSkee
    Joy plant
    Pen yan
    Ancient Use
    The ancient Egyptians used opium as far back as 2000 BC. Its main use was as a sedative for children. The Egyptians ate opium and also prepared it in the form of a flavor for a juice drink. It is even believed that opium is found in the Old Testament. The Hebrew word "rosh" is said to refer to the poppy, with the word "me-rosh" means "to the juice of the poppy". The ancient Assyrians' medical journals refer to poppy juice and the ancient Greeks also used it for medical purposes.

    Medicine
    {4a15.jpg}
    ...
    of opium havehas been known for centuries.dated back to centuries ago. Ancient Greek
    Morphine, which comes from opium resin, is one of the most effective drugs known for relief of severe pain and remains the standard against which new pain relievers are measured. Codeine is another component of opium. It is medically prescribed for the relief of moderate pain and cough suppression. It has less pain-killing ability than morphine and is usually taken orally. Heroin is also a popular component, which the Bayer Company of Germany introduced for medical use in 1898 ("Cannabis, Coca, & Poppy: Nature’s Addictive Plants"). Physicians remained unaware of its addiction potential for years, but by 1903, heroin abuse had risen to alarming levels in the United States.
    Recreational Use in ChinaIn Chi {2-opium-den-in-shanghai-1907.jpg} na, recreational use of opium began in the fifteenth century. Because the drug was rare and expensive, it was very limited. The opium trade became more regular when it was mixed with tobacco for smoking around the seventeenth century.
    ...
    "Cannabis, Coca, & Poppy: Nature’s Addictive Plants."Cannabis, Coca, & Poppy: Nature’s Addictive Plants. Web. 30 Nov. 2012. <http://www.deamuseum.org/ccp/opium/history.html>.
    "European Coalition for Just and Effective Drug Policies." European Coalition for Just and Effective Drug Policies. (28 October 2009) Web. 30 Nov. 2012. <http://opioids.com/narcotic-drugs/chapter-2.html>.
    ...
    Press, 1995. 9. Print.
    Mujassam, M. "Articles Bases." Articles Bases. (July 2011). Web. 30 Nov. 2012. <In China recreational use of the drug began in the fifteenth century but was limited by its rarity and expense. >.
    Stewart, Amy. Wicked Plants. North Carolina: Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, 2009. Print
    "Science Daily." Science Daily. Web. 29 Nov. 2012. <http://www.sciencedaily.com/articles/o/opium_poppy.htm>.
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    8:27 am
  3. page Coffee edited ... {IMG_6877-1024x768.jpg} When most of us think about coffee we picture our mugs full of it- h…
    ...
    {IMG_6877-1024x768.jpg}
    When most of us think about coffee we picture our mugs full of it- however, there is more than what meets the eye..
    ...
    red and round (thinkround(think of the
    ...
    grow correctly.
    The
    The harvesting of
    ...
    ripe enough.
    Once
    Once coffee farmers
    Pictures of the propagation:
    {220px-Coffee_Flowers.JPG}
    ...
    {220px-Starr_070308-5472_Coffea_arabica.jpg}
    These are the cherries that take up to 5 years to grow and ripen.
    Video on the process from cherry --> cup
    What is the origin of coffee?
    The origin of cultivation dates back to over 1,000 years ago in Yeman. However, the origin of species took place in Ethiopia, Africa.
    ...
    The birth of coffee:Kaldi is known as the coffee history legend. He and his sheep were roaming the southern tip of the Arabian Peninsula when they first encountered the coffee plant. His sheep began joyously dancing when they consumed the cherries on the shrub. Kaldi also began eating the cherries. The euphoric feeling that Kaldi felt convinced him to share these cherries with the local monastery. The monks immediately liked the cherries because they were able to keep them up for long periods of time.This was beneficial for their long hours of prayer. The monks began sharing the cherries with other monasteries around the world; it was then that coffee was born.
    The truths behind the legend:
    ...
    this day. However,
    it
    However,it took almost
    ...
    began. The Ethiopians
    may
    Ethiopiansmay have discovered
    ...
    cultivated it.
    Is coffee GOOD or BAD for you?
    Like most things there is a good AND a bad side of coffee:
    ...
    Type 2 diabetes.
    It
    diabetes.It might set
    ...
    and Parkinson's disease.
    The
    disease.The bad: Coffee
    ...
    been linked to
    increased
    toincreased risks of
    ...
    a day.
    References:http://www.google.com/imgres?q=map+of+the+places+that+grow+coffee&um=1&hl=en&client=safari&sa=N&tbo=d&rls=en&biw=1244&bih=626&tbm=isch&tbnid=go9HBQT5z8wPvM:&imgrefurl=http://charrow.com/100/category/conceptual/%3Fpg%3D2&docid=mBLQy1tftjOktM&imgurl=http://www.charrow.com/100/images/illustrations/Conceptual/Coffee-Map-World-Web.jpg&w=550&h=385&ei=rD62UMiCC4Ha2AX5t4GQCw&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=259&vpy=152&dur=88&hovh=188&hovw=268&tx=176&ty=92&sig=107882289303988862790&page=1&tbnh=133&tbnw=190&start=0&ndsp=18&ved=1t:429,r:1,s:0,i:90http://chilipaper.com/FNCC/how_coffee_is_grown___harveste.htm
    http://www.scaa.org/chronicle/2012/09/13/what-is-a-coffee-science-origin-trip/
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    7:34 am
  4. page Political & Historical Plants edited ... Plants make up the majority of human diets all over the world, aside from small amounts of mea…
    ...
    Plants make up the majority of human diets all over the world, aside from small amounts of meat. However, even the meat we consume comes from animals that eat plants. Food has largely affected history itself; for one thing, agriculture is what first led to the discontinuation of nomadism. It is believed that picking the crops {barley.JPG} of wild wheat and barley, and later deliberately sowing seeds into the soil, allowed communities to settle and establish themselves in one place. Villages began to grow and towns prospered. The remains of barley grain dating back to 7000 BCE have been found in almost every archaeological site of early farms. Barley and wheat prolonged life spans beyond the average age of around 40 years old. In this way, wheat and barley contributed to the advancement of civilization.
    {sugars.jpg} Refined sugar is a food substance that facilitated the enslavement of millions of Africans and people of the Caribbean for purely economic reasons, and is now causing serious health concerns for many developed nations. Unlike slaves working on cotton and tobacco farms, sugarcane pickers had to work much faster. This caused the life expectancy for workers in the sugarcane fields to be half that of those who worked in the tobacco fields. Sugarcane originated in New Guinea and made its way west, due to the fact that Europeans found it to be particularly attractive as a sweetner. It thus became an extremely lucrative commodity in certain marketplaces. The Caribbean Islands, particularly Barbados, Jamaica, Cuba, Haiti, and Grenada because the main locations for growing and processing the sugar plant. Sugar would then be sold primarily in European markets. The introduction of modern refined sugar began around the 16th century, allowing the slave trade associated with this product to last for 300 years (until around the 1850s), and leave a legacy of crime and wrong-doing that affects politics even today. Now, in a turn of events, an abundance of sugar and sugary products in the western world has led to significant health difficulties, including serious issues such as obesity and diabetes.
    ...
    lead to a number of historical events including the American
    ...
    sovereign state. The colonists also began drinking coffee rather than tea in spite of their former mother country.
    These examples of plants and food are but a small percentage of the many different ones that have impacted history. Understanding this connection will only broaden our knowledge of both plants and history, and help us to anticipate the future.
    Laws, Bill. Fifty Plants that Changed the Course of History. Buffalo: Firefly Books, 2010. Print.
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    7:06 am
  5. page Coffee edited ... Species:Species 1 - Coffea arabica L. (Arabian coffee)Species 2 - Coffea benghalensis Heyne ex…
    ...
    Species:Species 1 - Coffea arabica L. (Arabian coffee)Species 2 - Coffea benghalensis Heyne ex Schult. (Bengal coffee)Species 3 - Coffea canephora Pierre ex Froehner (Robusta coffee)Species 4 - Coffea congensis Froehner (Congo coffee)Species 5 - Coffea liberica W. Bull ex Hiern. (Liberian coffee)
    Although, there are 5 species of coffee Coffea arabica L. represents approximately 70 percent of the world’s total coffee production.
    ...
    periods of time. Thistime.This was beneficial
    ...
    was born.
    The truths behind the legend:
    There are some truths within the legendary tale of Kaldi. The truth is coffee did come from Ethiopia. Coffee continues to grow wild there to this day. However,
    it took almost 300 years before coffee was brought to the Arabian Peninsula. Once the coffee made it to the Arabian Peninsula the real history began. The Ethiopians
    may have discovered coffee but the Arabian people cultivated it.
    Is coffee GOOD or BAD for you?
    Like most things there is a good AND a bad side of coffee:
    The good: Coffee has been linked to decreased risk of skin and prostate cancers. It might lower depression risk in women. It could protect you from Type 2 diabetes.
    It might set off Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease.
    The bad: Coffee is addictive. It requires you to drink more and more to get the same "high" and eventually is needed just to feel "normal." It has been linked to
    increased risks of stillbirths and iron deficiency in mothers and babies. If coffee is consumed while you are taking certain medications it can cause liver damage.

    Interesting Facts:It
    ...
    drink coffee was.was.More than 50% of Americans enjoy at least one cup of coffee a day.
    References:http://www.google.com/imgres?q=map+of+the+places+that+grow+coffee&um=1&hl=en&client=safari&sa=N&tbo=d&rls=en&biw=1244&bih=626&tbm=isch&tbnid=go9HBQT5z8wPvM:&imgrefurl=http://charrow.com/100/category/conceptual/%3Fpg%3D2&docid=mBLQy1tftjOktM&imgurl=http://www.charrow.com/100/images/illustrations/Conceptual/Coffee-Map-World-Web.jpg&w=550&h=385&ei=rD62UMiCC4Ha2AX5t4GQCw&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=259&vpy=152&dur=88&hovh=188&hovw=268&tx=176&ty=92&sig=107882289303988862790&page=1&tbnh=133&tbnw=190&start=0&ndsp=18&ved=1t:429,r:1,s:0,i:90http://chilipaper.com/FNCC/how_coffee_is_grown___harveste.htm
    http://www.scaa.org/chronicle/2012/09/13/what-is-a-coffee-science-origin-trip/
    http://plants.usda.gov/java/ClassificationServlet?source=profile&symbol=COFFE&display=31
    http://www.coffeeresearch.org/coffee/history.htm
    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-08-19/world-s-top-10-coffee-producing-countries-in-2010-2011-table-.htmlhttp://theoatmeal.com/comics/coffeehttp://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-08-19/world-s-top-10-coffee-producing-countries-in-2010-2011-table-.htmlhttp://th__eoatmeal.com/comics/coffee__
    http://www.passionforcoffee.com/background/history/
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/09/19/is-coffee-bad-for-you_n_1895557.html

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    7:00 am

Tuesday, December 4

  1. page Opium poppy edited Opium Opium Poppy {4i2.jpg} Opium Poppy is a beautiful plant with a variety of uses. It c…
    Opium
    Opium
    Poppy
    {4i2.jpg}
    Opium Poppy is a beautiful plant with a variety of uses. It can be in your pastries, transformed into an addictive drug, and has even used to help toothaches and coughs. The plant is common to flower gardens and can come in rich reds and purples. The poppy seeds are used as a condiment with a nutty scent and flavor. On the complete opposite end, opium is used in the production of morphine, codeine, and other alkaloids. But on the positive side, it can ease pains and sedate. Regardless of its uses, opium has been around for centuries now. This plant continues to be a force in history, still being universally used today.
    What is Opium?
    {info_opium.jpg}
    ...
    The exuded fluid is scraped,
    {opium025.JPG}
    Facts
    ...
    Background
    {afghan-opium.jpg}
    The word opium originates from the Greek language, with opus meaning 'a juice.' Homer mentions it in The Illiad (Kapoor). It was likely brought in from Greece through Asia Minor. Opium cultivation has been traced back as early as 2600 B.C. in Switzerland. The plant was likely to be used for food value because of its poppy seeds. It is doubted that the narcotic property of this plant was known. The fluid extracted from the plant’s ovary is very narcotic once dried, this is the opium. The first known written source mentioning opium is dated back to around the third century BC.
    The
    production of
    ...
    Drug Enforcement Adm
    inistration
    Administration (Mujassam).
    Geographic LocationOpium is native to Asia Minor and is largely cultivated in Europe, Turkey, Persia, India and China.
    The CostWholesale: $3,000 per kilogram
    Retail: $16,000 per kilogram
    Addiction Opium is extremely addictive and one can develop physical and psychological dependence very quickly. Withdrawals from this drug can cause sweating, nausea, and the chills.
    HistoryThe word opium originates from the Greek language, with opus meaning 'a juice.' Homer mentions it in The Illiad (Kapoor). It was likely brought in from Greece through Asia Minor. Opium cultivation has been traced back as early as 2600 B.C. in Switzerland. The plant was likely to be used for food value because of its poppy seeds. It is doubted that the narcotic property of this plant was known. The fluid extracted from the plant’s ovary is very narcotic once dried, this is the opium. The first known written source mentioning opium is dated back to around the third century BC.
    Street Names
    Skee
    ...
    Pen yan
    Ancient Use
    ...
    a flavor
    for
    for a juice
    Medicine
    {4a15.jpg}
    ...
    Morphine, which comes from opium resin, is one of the most effective drugs known for relief of severe pain and remains the standard against which new pain relievers are measured. Codeine is another component of opium. It is medically prescribed for the relief of moderate pain and cough suppression. It has less pain-killing ability than morphine and is usually taken orally. Heroin is also a popular component, which the Bayer Company of Germany introduced for medical use in 1898 ("Cannabis, Coca, & Poppy: Nature’s Addictive Plants"). Physicians remained unaware of its addiction potential for years, but by 1903, heroin abuse had risen to alarming levels in the United States.
    Recreational Use in ChinaIn Chi {2-opium-den-in-shanghai-1907.jpg} na, recreational use of opium began in the fifteenth century. Because the drug was rare and expensive, it was very limited. The opium trade became more regular when it was mixed with tobacco for smoking around the seventeenth century.
    ...
    China in 1729, yet this1729 and was followed
    ...
    opium use. Since China had
    ...
    British trade, whichit led to
    ...
    the country.
    After 1860, opium use continued to increase with widespread domestic production in China. More than a quarter of the male population had become regular consumers by 1905 ("Science Daily"). Recreational or addictive opium use in other nations remained rare into the late nineteenth century.
    AfganPower of Opium in Afghanistan
    {marja_28schmidt6001.jpg}

    ReferencesAggrawa, Anil. "Narcotic Drugs." Narcotic Drugs. (May 1995). Web. 30 Nov. 2012. <http://opioids.com/narcotic-drugs/chapter-2.html>.
    "Cannabis, Coca, & Poppy: Nature’s Addictive Plants."Cannabis, Coca, & Poppy: Nature’s Addictive Plants. Web. 30 Nov. 2012. <http://www.deamuseum.org/ccp/opium/history.html>.
    (view changes)
    8:43 pm
  2. 8:00 pm
  3. page Black mulberry edited ... Also, in Greek Mythology Morea is the nymph of the mulberry tree. She is the daughter of Oxylo…
    ...
    Also, in Greek Mythology Morea is the nymph of the mulberry tree. She is the daughter of Oxylos and Hamadryas.
    Black Mulberry as a Protection Tree
    ...
    or netting.
    Sources
    {blacmulberry-fruit.jpg}
    (view changes)
    7:45 pm
  4. page Black mulberry edited ... Use The berries of the Morus nigra are very flavorful and can be used for cooking in a variet…
    ...
    Use
    The berries of the Morus nigra are very flavorful and can be used for cooking in a variety of ways. People eat them as a fruit, or use them in pies, puddings, jams, sauces and many other foods. The berries can also be fermented to make alcohol. The leaves of the plant are also used to feed domestic animals in some cases. The wood of plant is very useful because of its hardness and the fact that it is not affected by water. It is used to make things such as caskets and barrels.
    The tree has many other uses as a whole plant. One interesting example of this is its use as a “decoy” tree for other crops. Morus nigra is sometimes planted near other trees with expensive fruits in order to distract birds who are drawn to its delicious fruits instead.
    Morus Nigra in Greek Mythology
    The black mulberry is found in a few tales of Greek Mythology. The first of these is the Death of Pyramus and Thisbe. Pyramus and Thisbe were neighbors in the Assyrian city of Babylon, their houses separated by a wall. The were also in love, but were forbidden from seeing each other by their parents. Nevertheless they found ways to communicate for a while and eventually agreed to meet one night under a white mulberry tree. Thisbe arrived at the meeting spot first. Upon her arrival she spotted a lioness with blood covering her mouth, having just successfully hunted for food. Thisbe left the beast and the area, but left her cloak behind. When Pyramus came to the sight, he assumed that his lover had been eaten, and killed himself with a sword. When Thisbe returned, she discovered Pyramus, felt the same unbearable grief he felt after her presumed death, and stabbed herself with the sword. The white mulberry tree soaked up the lovers' blood, which gave the berries the dark red color we see today.
    Also, in Greek Mythology Morea is the nymph of the mulberry tree. She is the daughter of Oxylos and Hamadryas.
    Black Mulberry as a Protection Tree
    The black mulberry tree has many other uses as a whole plant. One interesting example of this is its use as a “decoy” tree for other crops. Morus nigra is sometimes planted near other trees with expensive fruits in order to distract birds who are drawn to its delicious fruits instead. This is an organic solution that removes the need for other non-natural methods of protection such as chemical sprays or netting.

    Sources
    {blacmulberry-fruit.jpg}
    ...
    Theoi Greek Mythology
    Greek Mythology Link
    Protector Plant
    (view changes)
    7:44 pm
  5. page Black mulberry edited ... Morus Nigra Black Mulberry Classification: Classification Kingdom - Plantae (Plants) Su…
    ...
    Morus Nigra
    Black Mulberry
    Classification:Classification
    Kingdom - Plantae (Plants)
    Subkingdom - Tracheobionta (Vascular Plants)
    ...
    Genus - Morus L. (mulberry)
    Species - Morus nigra L. (black mulberry)
    Taxonomy and Description: TheDescription
    The
    binomial name
    Additional common characteristics include the presence of two carpels (one is sometimes reduced) and clusters of multiple fruit. Specifically, Morus nigra is deciduous tree that grows up to 9 meters tall. Its leaves are rough on top, smooth on the bottom. The fruit is noted as a juicy, dark berry which gives the plant its name.
    Geographic Distribution: MorusDistribution
    Morus
    Nigra is
    {MONI.png} Black Mulberry Distribution in the United States
    Morus nigra is native to Persia (modern Iran) and was introduced in England during the reign of King James I. It is believed to have been known in southern Europe since the earliest of times, namely the Greeks and Romans who likely brought it elsewhere.
    Use: TheUse
    The
    berries of
    The tree has many other uses as a whole plant. One interesting example of this is its use as a “decoy” tree for other crops. Morus nigra is sometimes planted near other trees with expensive fruits in order to distract birds who are drawn to its delicious fruits instead.
    ...
    in Greek Mythology:Mythology
    The black mulberry is found in a few tales of Greek Mythology. The first of these is the Death of Pyramus and Thisbe. Pyramus and Thisbe were neighbors in the Assyrian city of Babylon, their houses separated by a wall. The were also in love, but were forbidden from seeing each other by their parents. Nevertheless they found ways to communicate for a while and eventually agreed to meet one night under a white mulberry tree. Thisbe arrived at the meeting spot first. Upon her arrival she spotted a lioness with blood covering her mouth, having just successfully hunted for food. Thisbe left the beast and the area, but left her cloak behind. When Pyramus came to the sight, he assumed that his lover had been eaten, and killed himself with a sword. When Thisbe returned, she discovered Pyramus, felt the same unbearable grief he felt after her presumed death, and stabbed herself with the sword. The white mulberry tree soaked up the lovers' blood, which gave the berries the dark red color we see today.
    Also, in Greek Mythology Morea is the nymph of the mulberry tree. She is the daughter of Oxylos and Hamadryas.
    Sources:Sources
    {blacmulberry-fruit.jpg}
    United States Department of Agriculture
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    7:29 pm

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